Untitled
Co-Morbidities and Adverse Drug Reactions in HIV
Previous Workshops

Information can be found below for the last 7 International Workshops on Co-morbidities and Adverse Drug Reactions in HIV.

2017 - Milan, Italy, Scientific programme (Affiliated with European AIDS Clinical Society)

Plenary speakers Affiliation Presentation Title
Stefan Anker University Medical Center Göttingen, Germany Sarcopenia and cachexia in chronic illness – definition, common pathophysiology and lessons learned from recent trials
Juliet Compston

University of
Cambridge, UK

Osteoporosis Treatment: Current Advances and Future Prospects
David Cooper University of New
South Wales, Sydney, Australia
HIV co-morbidities: past present, future
Stefano Del Prato University of Pisa,
Italy
Cardiovascular Outcome Trials in T2DM
Sven Enerback University of Gothenburg, Sweden Brown fat and making white fat beige

back to top

2016 - New York, USA, Scientific programme

Plenary speakers Affiliation Presentation Title
Toren Finkel National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, USA The metabolic regulation of aging
Gerard Karsenty Columbia University Medical Center, USA The impact of bone on whole-organism physiology
Dorothy Lewis University of Texas, USA Adipose tissue as an HIV reservoir
Seth Martin

John Hopkins School  of Medicine, USA

New therapies for LDL management
Steve Schroeder University of California San Francisco, USA Get your HIV/AIDS patients to stop smoking before it kills them

back to top

2015 - Barcelona, Spain, Scientific programme (Affiliated with European AIDS Clinical Society)

Plenary speakers Affiliation Presentation Title

Patrice Cacoub

Hopital La Pitié Salpêtrière, France

Extra-Hepatic Manifestations of Hepatitis C Virus: Beyond the Liver

Matteo Cesari

University of Toulouse, France

Frailty: Concept and clinical consequences

Warner C. Greene

University of California, USA

Cell Death by Pyroptosis Drives CD4 T Cell Depletion During HIV Infection

Andrew Tager

Harvard Medical School, USA

Organ Fibrosis:  A Major Cause of Co-Morbidity in HIV Infection

Francesc  Villarroya

University of Barcelona, Spain

The role of adipose tissue in HIV-infected patients

back to top

2014 - Philadelphia, USA, Scientific programme

Plenary speakers Affiliation Presentation Title

Beau Ances

Washington University, St Louis, MO, USA

Persistence of HIV Associated Neurocognitive Disorders (HAND) in the Combination Antiretroviral Therapy Era (cART)

Shalender Bhasin

Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA

Late onset hypogonadism

David Harrison

Vanderbilt University Medical Centre, Nashville, TN, USA

Inflammation and pathogenesis of hypertension

Janice Schwartz

University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA

Aging and drug metabolism, multiple co-morbidities and polypharmacy—lessons  applicable to  treating HIV infected patient

David D’Alessio

Duke University, Durham, NC, USA

Anti-diabetic drugs (GLP-1 agonists, DPPIV inhibitors, etc.)

back to top

2013 - Brussels, Belgium, Scientific programme (Affiliated with European AIDS Clinical Society)

Plenary speakers Affiliation Presentation Title

Claudio Franceschi

University of Bologna, Italy

Inflamm-ageing: immunological and non-immunological players            

Fergus Shanahan    

University College Cork, Ireland

The gut microbiota, health, disease and ageing            

Simon Thomas     

Newcastle University, UK

Drug-induced QT prolongation – quantifying the risks

Heiner Wedemeyer

Hannover Medical School, Germany

Adverse events of DAA against HCV

Patrick Mallon

University College Dublin, Ireland

Fractures in HIV

Scott Kinlay  

Brigham and Women's Hospital, USA

Inflammation and heart disease

back to top

2012 - Washington, USA, Scientific programme (Affiliated with International AIDS Society)

Plenary speakers Affiliation Presentation Title

Joel Palefsky 

University of California San Francisco, USA

HPV-related morbidity in HIV-infected men and women: challenges and opportunities

Michel V McConnell

Stanford University, USA

Cardiovascular imaging for atherosclerosis    

Linda Fried

Columbia University, USA

Frailty and disability in association with HIV and aging

Kenneth M Kunisaki

University of Minnesota, USA

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD): relevance to HIV clinical care and research

Brendan Payne

Newcastle University, UK

Mitochondria and aging

Tamara Harris

National Institutes of Health, USA

Aging in cohort studies

back to top

2011 - Rome, Italy, Scientific programme

Plenary speakers Affiliation Presentation Title

Jan Hoeijmakers

Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands

The DNA damage-aging connection

George Schett

University of Erlangen-Nuremberg,Erlangen, Germany

Osteoimmunology

Paola Cinque

San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy

Present issues on HIV infection of the nervous system and its consequences

Göran Hansson

Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden

Immune and inflammatory mechanisms in atherosclerosis – insights from men and mice

Tom Hostetter

Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York, USA

Measures of renal function and injury

Robert Ross

Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada

Visceral adiposity: the conduit between lipodystrophy and cardiometabolic risk

back to top

2010 - London, UK, Scientific programme

Plenary speakers Affiliation Presentation Title

Remy Burcelin

INSERM, Toulouse, France

Intestinal microflora and low grade metabolic inflammation

John Adams

University of California-Los Angeles, USA

Vitamin D insufficiency and its immune and metabolic consequences?

Kenneth Feingold

University of California San Francisco, USA

The effect of inflammation on lipid and lipoprotein metabolism

Rolf Jager

Reader at the UCL Institute of Neurology, University College London Hospitals, UK

Neuroimaging: HIV-related neurocognitive impairment and HIV-related disorders

Cliff Rosen

Maine Medical Center Research Institute, USA

Body composition, fat and bone: What's the connection to drugs and HIV

Heiner Wedemeyer

Hannover Medical School, Germany

Adverse Drug Reactions in the Treatment of HBV-monoinfection

back to top